Author Archives: grace

“The Wok in America” at MOFAD

I rarely give talks in New York City, but on Tuesday, July 18th I’ll be speaking about “The Wok in America” at the Museum of Food and Drink (MOFAD) in Brooklyn, where the exhibition, “Chow: Making the Chinese American Restaurant” is currently on view. My own family’s wok, circa 1949, is one of the items on display. If you’re familiar with my cookbooks, you might remember that my parents did not use a wok. They stir-fried with a stainless-steel skillet because a round-bottomed wok wouldn’t work on their electric stove. I was reunited with my ancestral wok just a few Read More …

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The Last Handmade Wrought Iron Woks of Shanghai

In December, I reported that the Cen brothers, the Shanghai wok artisans whose woks grace the cover of “The Breath of a Wok,” closed shop. Since that posting I’ve received numerous emails, some desperate on how to buy a Cen hand-pounded wok. Sadly, there is no hidden stash. Someone I know contacted one of the brothers who confirmed the business is permanently closed. There is some good news in the hand-pounded wok universe. A few months ago, Christopher St Cavish wrote a piece Meeting Tao Qingjian,The Last Woksmith in Smartshanghai.com. Tao’s woks are dramatically different from the Cen woks because the Read More …

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“The Wisdom of the Chinese Kitchen” Video

It’s hard to believe it’s been eight years since my father passed away. Without Baba, I would not have written “The Wisdom of the Chinese Kitchen.” Of all my books it is the one dearest to me. When I was a child my parents didn’t think it was important to teach me how to cook. Juggling the demands of a full-time job, by the time my mother came home and started cooking the evening meal, it was with brusque efficiency. The tone of the kitchen was not a relaxed atmosphere that encouraged my participating. Nor would my parents have allowed me Read More …

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Ramps

Every year, as the first hints of spring begin to appear, I start looking for ramps at the local farmer’s market. Here in the East, they’re the definitive sign that winter is truly behind us. In New York City, ramps are expensive, sold in tiny, precious bundles for about $20/pound. A scarce commodity, they’re pricey because they’re foraged (not grown in farm fields or gardens) and their season is super-short. Ramps (Allium trioccum) are also called wild leeks, but that doesn’t do them justice. My friend Kathy Gunst, in her wonderful cookbook Notes from a Maine Kitchen, describes the way Read More …

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Tim Ho Wan

Ever since the Hong Kong-based dim sum restaurant Tim Ho Wan opened in New York, customers have been waiting 2 to 3 hours to get in. It’s claim to fame is it’s known as the world’s cheapest Michelin-starred restaurant. I wasn’t about to wait 2 hours but to my shock I slipped in last week and scored a table–the equivalent of Hamilton tickets in the dim sum universe. The quality of the ingredients is excellent, but with a 2 star-rating I was expecting something over the top. Here are two of their specialties: steamed shrimp and chive dumplings and deep Read More …

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  • WHAT’S HAPPENING

    Museum of Food and Drink MOFAD
    Brooklyn, NY
    Tues, July 18, 2017
    Cooking Demo and Lecture
    "Chow: Making the Chinese American Restaurant"

    Museum of Chinese in America
    New York City
    Grace is a featured chef in "Sour, Sweet, Bitter, Spicy"
    Exhibit runs through Sept, 2017




  • Click the image above for my online stir-fry class with a special discount. You'll learn how to make a perfect stir-fry for healthy and delicious meals. And you'll understand how to care and maintain your carbon-steel wok!

  • If you're interested in developing your
    stir-fry skills, join
    Wok Wednesdays,
    a group of wok and
    stir-fry enthusiasts.

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